For Schools - 24-7 YouthWork - Youth Work that is all about being local, staying committed
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Local churches

and local schools

share a genuine

concern for young

people.

Much of a young person’s day is spent at school and much of their life is

concerned with it. School is a place where many of their problems surface

and their significant social circles form.

 

24-7YW formalises a local relationship between a school and a church

based upon shared outcomes and agreed upon practices. This keeps

everyone happy and unlocks local resources to get on with the job of

being there for our young people.

 

Because churches are embedded in their local communities they have

a high degree of voluntarism and form natural relational communities.

Churches can provide good role models and safe places for young

people. It doesn’t take long to recognise that a church and school’s

common interests far outweigh their differences.

 

If you are a school and/or Principal that is interested in having 24-7

youth workers in your school then please contact Jay Geldard (Network

Coordinator) directly.

faq
How does a local school and a local church work together?

In any context where the different parts of local community work together, it is vital that all parties are able to stay true to their identity, vision and values. The 24-7 YouthWork model achieves this by focusing on outcomes parties have in common – wanting to see young people be educated well, succeed and flourish in their future. Over a period of time a natural trust relationship is formed and cherished. All parties work hard to keep that trust by working with utmost respect for each other. Across all of the schools which have 24-7 YouthWorkers, there has never been a situation where a student or school has felt there has been an agenda other than the shared outcomes that have been agreed upon. It is not a 24-7 YouthWorker’s role or agenda to proselytise. All 24-7 YouthWorkers recognise that there is a huge range of different beliefs in a school context and are respectful of this. Our role is to be there for all young people. The school has a say in any activity at all times.

What kind of training do the 24-7 youth workers have?

Whilst all 24-7 YouthWorkers are youth leaders in their youth communities, the background of each 24-7 YouthWorker is different. Some have a high level of training, such as being qualified in Youth Work, Counselling, Teaching, Outdoor Education, etc., while others are fresh out of school themselves. All 24-7 YouthWorkers have the backing of a reputable network which will help them keep to 24-7 YouthWork standards and will ensure training needs are met. This includes a thorough orientation, then compulsory completion of the Level 3 Youth Work National Certificate within their first year – including Risk Management, Treaty of Waitangi and Code of Ethics training. Other ‘highly recommended’ training is available to 24-7 YouthWorkers through the network and through their local Youth Leadership Team.

How long does it take to set up 24-7YW in my school?

This is dependent on various factors, including:

  • Finding quality youth workers
  • Securing funding
  • Raising awareness and collaborating with community stakeholders
  • Is there a church nearby that is willing to join the 24-7YW Network and has the capacity to provide and sustain youth workers?
How many youth workers does a typical school have?

There is a general practice of a 1:300 ratio.  Most schools will begin with two youth workers (co-ed schools will attempt to employ a male and a female).  However, the number of youth workers in any given school is dependent upon the school’s needs, finances and availability of quality youth workers.

How much does 24-7YW cost?
  • The actual cost of 24-7 YouthWork to a school varies depending upon the number of youth workers and the contributions of church partners and local communities. Each youth worker’s costs include:

    • Youth worker wages for 10 hours per week in-school during school terms.
    • Activity budgets for the worker.
    • Administration and insurance.

    When establishing 24-7 YouthWork in a school, churches or a church-based agency may fund part of 24-7 YouthWork and/or be able to raise funds from the community for this. However schools are expected play their part, especially once 24-7 YouthWork becomes established and its value to school becomes apparent.

    Previous experience has shown that even at full cost 24-7 YouthWork is extraordinary value for money for any school.

How beneficial is 24-7YW?

24-7 YouthWork is an established and effective approach. It has been a forerunner to emerging national trends in youth work and has research that affirms its value for young people and schools.

See Research

In 2002 the Ministry of Youth Development published Youth Development Strategy Aotearoa as a policy platform for government agencies and others who work with young people. The strategy asserts in six principles that youth development is:

  • Shaped by the “big picture?
  • About young people being connected
  • Based on a strengths-based approach
  • Happens through quality relationships
  • Triggered when young people fully participate
  • Needing good information

These principles are implicit in 24-7 YouthWork. 24-7 YouthWork is positive in emphasis, relational in nature and helps young people increase their in-school and out-of-school connections. 24-7 YouthWork also constantly evolves to reflect youth culture, encourages young people to make their own decisions and has been committed to research.

What does a typical week look like for a youth worker?

This will obviously depend on the needs of the school and ‘big’ events that youth workers may be involved in (camps, the school ball, Stage Challenge, etc.). A typical week will usually involve youth workers being present throughout the lunch hour: running lunchtime activities, joining in with sport or simply hanging out with students. The remaining hours spent in school could involve mentoring prefects, attending school production practices, one-on-one mentoring, helping out with school trips, coaching sport teams, etc.

Do the youth workers only work with ‘at risk’ young people?

In a word: “No”.  While 24-7 YouthWorkers are available to work with ‘difficult’ or ‘at-risk’ students, they are also available to help those who are in need of support and encouragement.  Because youth workers are not teachers and they are also not there to just support the young people, they are an invaluable link between staff and students so that both can be understood.

Each youth worker has gifts and life skills they can bring to the school, so mentoring is not their sole focus.  Youth workers are willing and able to be involved in the wider life of the school such as: school productions, coaching sports’ teams, attending classes, etc. – in a nutshell they want to serve the school wherever possible.

How do 24-7 youth workers work with Guidance Counsellors?

All 24-7 YouthWorkers need to have a relationship with key staff within the school, including Guidance Counsellors and Social Workers. 24-7 YouthWorkers are aware that they are not Counsellors or Social Workers and are aware of these boundaries, although all 24-7 YouthWorkers are trained in basic counselling skills and referrals.
24-7 YouthWorkers are often utilised by the School Guidance Counsellors or Social Workers where a young person needs extra support and time outside of what they can give. In this case, the 24-7 YouthWorker would work collaboratively, reporting back to the school staff about the work they were doing with the young person. Our focus is on being preventative and working in the strengths based way with young people.
With a real focus on having a high level of availability and ‘hangout’ time with young people, 24-7 YouthWorkers can fill a real gap for young people which complements the role School Guidance Counsellors or Social Workers play in their lives.

What is the 24-7YW Network and what is its role?

One of the differences with 24-7 YouthWorkers as opposed to other agencies is that they belong to a reputable network of YouthWorkers nationwide, with a long shared experience of Youth Work in a local school and community. At the same time, each setting’s individual flavour is encouraged through the philosophy that we are a network of local settings.
The 24-7 YouthWork Network exists to support 24-7 YouthWork and does this by:
• Setting key policies which ensure a consistent standard can be expected with 24-7 YouthWorkers
• Providing support to Managers in local settings
• Helping expand and develop the 24-7 YouthWork model
• Supporting local settings to get set up with 24-7 YouthWork

Does 24-7YW work with Intermediate and Primary Schools?

24-7YW’s current focus is youth Years 7-13 (10-18 years old).  So while we are in some primary schools, the youth workers work predominately with the Year 7 and 8 students in this environment..

What support is required from the school for the 24-7 YouthWorkers?

A member of staff (often a Deputy Principal) is identified as a liaison person and key contact for the YouthWorkers.  All events and interactions are run past this person to ensure the relationship is kept transparent and YouthWorkers are achieving their set goals within the school environment.  The responsibility of the school liaison is to meet with the YouthWorkers regularly and sustain a relationship with the Team Leader and YouthWorkers themselves.

How are the 24-7 YouthWorkers kept accountable?
    • Each term the Team Leader produces a report for key staff at the school which outlines what the 24-7 YouthWorkers have done that term. It also includes statistics on the contact the 24-7 YouthWorkers have had with students and their average hours per week. It also reports back on any particular areas of focus for that term. Key staff sit down with the Team Leader and YouthWorkers to go through the Term Report, share perspectives and plan for the upcoming term.
      Good communication is important to ensure the 24-7 YouthWorkers are meeting the needs of young people and the school. The frequency of communication is decided between the Team Leader and School Liaison.
      Weekly on-line diaries are also completed so at any time the Team Leader and School are able to access this breakdown of how the 24-7 YouthWorker has spent their hours both in and out of school in their 24-7 YouthWork role.

Positive Youth Development

 

24-7 YouthWork is an established and effective approach. It has been a forerunner to emerging national

trends in youth work and has research that affirms its value for young people and schools.

“Young people have multiple ‘worlds’ they interact with. The stronger the connection between the young person and the four worlds around them the more successful their transition to adulthood will be and the stronger our community will become.”

positive-results

In 2002 the Ministry of Youth Development published ‘Youth Development Strategy Aotearoa’ as a policy platform for government agencies and others who work with young people.

The strategy asserts in six principles that youth development is:

• Shaped by the ‘big picture’

• About young people being connected

• Based on a strengths-based approach

• Happens through quality relationships

• Triggered when young people fully participate

• Needing good information

 

These principles are implicit in 24-7 YouthWork.

 

24-7 YouthWork is positive in emphasis, relational in nature and helps young people increase their in-school and out-of-school connections. It also constantly evolves to reflect youth culture, encourages young people to make their own decisions and has been committed to research.

youth-development

The 2006 National Youth
Workers Network report, ‘Real
Work’, noted as one of its key

findings that schools should

be recognised as an important

context for youth work.